Tag Archives: Robert E. Lee

The Confederacy vs. the PC Confederacy of Dunces

(Note:  This rant was originally going to be published earlier, but got sidetracked with the whole “gay marriage” thing.)

Since that sick, cowardly, vile, racist little piece of excrement shot up an historic black church in Charleston over a week ago, controversy (and not a little bit of hysteria) rages on concerning the Confederate battle flag, which he had posed with in some pictures posted online.

As is usual with high-profile vile murders these days, before the bodies were even cold, the left began politicizing it, including Dear Leader, who predictably used it to pitch government “gun control,” blamed the “dark part of our history,” making the absurd and patently false claim that such violence “does not happen in other advanced countries.”

As usual, blame everyone and everything but the murderer himself.

But the real drama centered around the Confederate battle flag, and the Racist South in general, which somehow became seen by the left, and even by some so-called “conservatives” as the real  villain behind the murders.

When the Republican South Carolina governor Nikki Haley called for the battle flag to be removed from the state courthouse, she was widely applauded, as if she had made some kind of heroic decision.

But that action was hardly enough in the eyes the politically correct mob.  People began screaming for the flag to be removed from private property that was visible to the public.  Walmart and Amazon (the latter company not known to avoid selling “offensive” items) began removing all merchandise bearing the flag from their inventory.  No more Dukes of Hazzard!

In the debate over the flag, I saw and heard a lot of ignorant ranting, from both liberals, and some “conservatives” comparing the Confederacy to the Nazis, and the flag to the Nazi swastika.

The old Yankee charge was also brought up quite a bit that the Confederates were all vile traitors to their country, and thus deserving of no memory but contempt and shame.

But back then, people in the States, at least in the Southern States, sincerely saw their “country” as being their home state, rather than the federal Union, and it was to their state that they owed their patriotic loyalty, which they saw as a sacred thing.  Most Southerners regarded fighting against their home state as traitorous and dishonorable.  The Union was a creation of the various States, rather than the other way around, and Southerners (as well as many Yankees) believed states should be free to secede if they wished.

Both Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. “Stonewall”  Jackson (to use the examples of the two most famous and celebrated Confederate generals) fought for the Confederacy out of profound loyalty to their home state, rather than to perpetuate slavery, and both tended to side with the Union, until federal troops were sent in to invade South Carolina.  This tipped Virginia and other “border states” into joining the Confederacy, against what was seen as unjust federal aggression.

The war was also not primarily about slavery, but over the issue of whether states had the right to secede from the Unions.  Freeing of the slaves was originally not even a Union objective.  The Emancipation Proclamation occurred late in the war (and only applied to slaves in Confederate states.)

The Southern states did not seek to overthrow the federal government, but to secede and be independent from Washington and the federal government (just as the American colonies sought independence from the British Crown, rather than to overthrow the king in England).

Jackson prayed fervently with others for war to be avoided, and before the war, Lee said if he could, he would personally buy the freedom of every slave if it could prevent war.

Lee and Jackson would have both been appalled at the abuse of the flag in the Charleston murders.

The history of the war and the Confederacy is complex and nuanced, rather than the simplistic cartoon version of history preached by the politically correct.  For many Southerners, the flag is a symbol of honor and Southern pride, rather than racism or slavery.  Officially banning the flag as a symbol of racial hatred is actually a victory for the hateful crazies to allow them to define the flag’s meaning.

The hysterical politically correct frenzy to remove all traces of the battle flag, and other signs of the heritage of the old South, of course, does absolutely nothing to stop or prevent racism or hateful acts of violence.  It’s not as if that loser would not have committed those murders had only the flag not been flying at the courthouse.

And forcibly removing anything that people claim offends them raises a troubling precedent.

I’d personally be curious to know how many liberals screaming for the Confederate flag to be banned from public also oppose legislation that would protect the American flag from burning or other desecration.

The Confederate flag offends some people, so it needs to be removed from public view, but pee on a crucifix, and it’s “art” and “free speech” that must be funded with public tax dollars.

America may be weaker than ever before in modern history, our real liberties decreasing, while we borrow and spend at a frantic pace, laying a massive, unpayable debt on our young and future generations.  But, hell, the gays can “marry,” and we’ve gotten rid of the Confederate flag, so everything’s swell!

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